• Andy Denzler, 2541, Sleepwalker II, Diptych, 2018, Oil on canvas, 200 x 300 cm © Andy Denzler
  • Andy Denzler, The Dark Eagle, 2018, Oil on canvas, 200 x 300 cm © Andy Denzler
  • Andy Denzler, The Pool, 2018, 200 x 300 cm, Oil on Canvas, Diptych © Andy Denzler
  • Andy Denzler, Wallpaper Falling off the Wall, 2014, Oil on canvas, 180 x 300 cm (Zweiteilig) © Andy Denzler
  • Andy Denzler, Woman with White Shirt on a White Cover, 2018, Oil on canvas, 180 x 150 cm © Andy Denzler
  • Andy Denzler, 2541, Sleepwalker II, Diptych, 2018, Oil on canvas, 200 x 300 cm © Andy Denzler
  • Andy Denzler, The Dark Eagle, 2018, Oil on canvas, 200 x 300 cm © Andy Denzler
  • Andy Denzler, The Pool, 2018, 200 x 300 cm, Oil on Canvas, Diptych © Andy Denzler
  • Andy Denzler, Wallpaper Falling off the Wall, 2014, Oil on canvas, 180 x 300 cm (Zweiteilig) © Andy Denzler
  • Andy Denzler, Woman with White Shirt on a White Cover, 2018, Oil on canvas, 180 x 150 cm © Andy Denzler

Andy Denzler

The Dark Corner of the Human Mind

18.8. – 20.9.2018

Born in Zurich in 1965, Andy Denzler lives and works in Switzerland. After painting abstract works for over a decade, the artist began exploring the idea of movement and distortion in painting.
Denzler’s work is recognisable at first glance; his paintings reveal his very unique style. The artist paints his scenes, carefully drafted and pre-constructed in photo montages, in alla-prima on the canvas and then “develops” the image by sweeping the wet oil paint in a swift, mostly horizontal motion, across the image plane.

As a result of this original aesthetic, Denzler’s creations merge the figurative and the abstract. Denzler integrates figures and scenes from everyday life as captured through photography. Thus, figuration leaves room to non-figuration and all is united in a neutral palette, composed of more subdued colors such as flesh tones, ochres and browns.

Denzler’s iconography is in a sense traditional. His portraits and interior scenes are reminiscent of old paintings, and depict ordinary men and women in their daily routines.
Denzler paints the human figure - men and women who are anonymous and individualised
at the same time.
In our world overloaded with images, such artists were able to resist to the immediacy and urgency that the new media have to offer and give their images a new temporality,
allowing the viewer to reflect and contemplate.
This relationship with time is reflected in Andy Denzler’s work: first in his painting process as the artist must subdue the paint before it dries; then on the canvas itself which shows its underlying layers and finally in the picture, which is striated just like on old television screens when the ‘pause’ button was pressed on a VHS player. From one second to another, time is made to stop.

Andy Denzler makes us discover the world through a different perspective. He unveils a new concrete reality. Each canvas becomes a moment suspended in time, a unique experience.

Denzler’s work was exhibited in many different galleries and institutions in Europe, in the United States and in Asia. Some of his pieces now belong to prestigious private and public collections such as the Ludwig Museum, the Crédit Suisse Collection in Switzerland or the Hirshhorn Museum in Washington, D.C.

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